Washington (AFP) – By the time an international group of scientists stunned the world with the first ever image of a black hole, they were already planning a sequel: a movie showing how massive clouds of gas are forever sucked into the void.

The Event Horizon Telescope Collaboration has already recorded the necessary observations and is processing the mountains of data to produce the first video, which will likely be a little jerky, in 2020.

“What I predict is that by the end of the next decade we will be making high quality real-time movies of black holes that reveal not just how they look, but how they act on the cosmic stage,” Shep Doeleman, the project’s director, told AFP in an interview.

The entire team, comprising 347 scientists from around the world, were honored Thursday with the Breakthrough Prize in Fundamental Physics, winning $3 million for the so-called “Oscar of science” for the image they released on April 10.

“I’ve been working on this for 20 years. So my wife was finally convinced that what I was doing was worth it a little bit,” joked the 52-year-old father of two, who is an astronomer at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics.

Astronomers could previously detect the light that is being swallowed by black holes, but

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