Jupiter, the largest planet in the solar system, is perhaps most famous for its giant Red Spot, a continuous storm that has been observed since 1830. But now, new powerful storms have started on the gas giant and they are disrupting the planet’s belts.

These storms are affecting the planet’s white and brown belts, creating distortion among the bands, which are usually separated. Made of ammonia and water vapor, the storms are rising through Jupiter’s cloud layer and then being condensed into white plumes.

Jupiter in radio waves with ALMA (top) and visible light with the Hubble Space Telescope (bottom). The eruption in the South Equatorial Belt is visible in both images. (Credit: ALMA [ESO/NAOJ/NRAO] I de Pater et al.; NRAO/AUI NSF, S. Dagnello; NASA/Hubble)

Jupiter in radio waves with ALMA (top) and visible light with the Hubble Space Telescope (bottom). The eruption in the South Equatorial Belt is visible in both images. (Credit: ALMA [ESO/NAOJ/NRAO] I de Pater et al.; NRAO/AUI NSF, S. Dagnello; NASA/Hubble)

NASA TO EXPLORE JUPITER’S MOON EUROPA, WHICH MAY HOLD LIFE

“If these plumes are vigorous and continue to have convective events, they may disturb one of these ent