Every step of the way, spaceflight tends to disagree with the human body, and two astronauts looking to return to Earth this weekend are prepared for the possibility their stomachs may revolt at the harsh treatment.

NASA veterans Doug Hurley and Bob Behnken launched to the International Space Station tucked inside a SpaceX Crew Dragon on May 30 on a test mission dubbed Demo-2. The last leg of their journey will begin when they climb into the same capsule on Saturday (Aug. 1) for the one-day trip back to Earth to land in the waters off Florida.

While NASA won’t let the astronauts leave if conditions at sea look dangerous, those waters could still be choppy. And their stomachs have spent two months in microgravity digesting a diet of space-stable food.

Related: SpaceX’s historic Demo-2 Crew Dragon astronaut test flight: Full coverage

An uncrewed SpaceX Crew Dragon capsule used during the Demo-1 test mission seen in the ocean after it splashed down in March 2src19.

An uncrewed SpaceX Crew Dragon capsule used during the Demo-1 test mission seen in the ocean after it splashed down in March 2019. (Image credit: NASA/Cory Huston)

The results could get ugly, but Hurley and Behnken say they’re prepared.

“I’ll answer for Doug and say that we’ll both have the appropriate hardware ready, should we start feeling a little bit sick on board while we’re in the vehicle after splashdown,” Behnken said during a news conference held by the NASA astronauts on board the space station on Friday (July 31)..

Yes, when it comes to spaceflight there’s always “appropriate hardware” involved, even for a phenomenon as mundane as seasickness. And what does that hardware entail?

“Just like on an airliner, there are bags if you need them, and we’ll have those handy,” Hurley said. “We’ll probably have some towels handy as well.” On the bright side, by then, gravity will be back, reducing the chaos

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